RECIPES

Foods to make in praise of our Blessed FSM, pasta based and otherwise.

Moderator: All Things Mods

User avatar
bonsaiherb
Fusilli Fuselier
Posts: 151
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2014 10:57 am
Location: Buried under a lavender field in Sequim, WA
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby bonsaiherb » Sat Jun 28, 2014 3:35 pm

Pork Chops & Sweet Potatoes
Some wonderful cooks in here. Loved the ideas and recipes. The Pork Chops & Sweet Potatoes really hit home as did the great commentary on Chili by Postby Arkaeon.

I too use Worcestershire sauce in my cooking but I will also include
Maggi seasoning - as be a German substitute. A few drops in chicken soup always made it taste better. It was also good to spice up that Asian cooking, especially for that dreaded Tofu!

Today I blanch at the thought of all that MSG and sodium.) It is very popular in German-speaking countries and I still keep a bottle around. One of the few things I know that won't spoil.
It also goes a long way and just a few drops of the umami-rich flavor adds depth to noodles, stir-fries, soups, and other dishes.

Worcestershire Sauce is more organic and is akin to soy sauce and fish sauce. The salt and sodium content however is considerably less. One ingredient to be concerned about is the anchovy part of it. If you are allergic to fish or anchovies you might be cautious in using it. Maggi has no anchovies, just that lovely monosodium glutamate. The Worcestershire has vinegar, molasses, onions, garlic, peppers in it.

One other thing in the German cooking was to caramelize the onions. One reason being that we did not have the 'sweet onions' that are available today. I still caramelize the white onions. Garlic is another story and you can wreck them doing that. I generally add them at the end.

Image

pennefromheaven
Ziti Zealot
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2014 6:32 pm

Re: RECIPES

Postby pennefromheaven » Sun Dec 14, 2014 12:47 am

In somewhat recent reality TV show (which I am proud to say I never have watched) a member from the cast refers to something called "skeddy and budder". (My Mumsie takes great pleasure (schadenfreude style) watching this show and when I am trying to figure out what to make for dinner she cheekily suggests howz about some skeddy and budder? (banjo sound clip please) Anyhow all joking aside, there is a great dish where you brown fresh garlic in butter and olive oil, pancetta (or prosciutto or whatever smoked bacon you might have) add it to skeddy (vermicelli or spaghettini is also nice) Parmesan and some fresh chopped parsley - there you have it! skeddy and budder ! A green salad on the side - but hey - as the actor from the show says about eating greens "we're not animals!!!!"

PirateHelloKitty
Maccheroncelli Missionary
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2015 2:22 pm
Location: Canada

Re: RECIPES

Postby PirateHelloKitty » Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:40 am

I like pasta with peanut butter and soy sauce. It is good with spaghetti.

Some chopped onion and garlic, ginger fried in oil of choice. Some chopped red bell pepper fried up. Some curry paste can be added or chili flakes and then the peanut butter, water and soy sauce. The peanut butter clumps up and it takes much sitrring to get the sauce smooth. Do not add to much soy sauce because it can make the sauce too salty. Some other steamed veggies can be added later. You might google a recipe for exact amounts. I just throw in ingredients and taste.

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Nov 28, 2015 10:57 am

PirateHelloKitty wrote:I like pasta with peanut butter and soy sauce. It is good with spaghetti.

Some chopped onion and garlic, ginger fried in oil of choice. Some chopped red bell pepper fried up. Some curry paste can be added or chili flakes and then the peanut butter, water and soy sauce. The peanut butter clumps up and it takes much sitrring to get the sauce smooth. Do not add to much soy sauce because it can make the sauce too salty. Some other steamed veggies can be added later. You might google a recipe for exact amounts. I just throw in ingredients and taste.

Here's an Asian analog to try. I adapted it some years back to double as both a dipping sauce, and a dressing for pasta (just thin it a little further for pasta). For pasta, my favorite way to serve it is tossed with cold buckwheat soba noodles, and garnish with finely sliced scallions, small julienne of cucumber (peel and deseed) and/or mung bean spouts ... I really like it. As a dipping sauce, I find it works best with raw snow peas and shocked white asparagus. For chicken satay dipping sauce, just whisk in a pinch or two of curry powder.

ASIAN PEANUT SAUCE
{makes just over 1/2 cup, which is enough sauce for 2 adults or roughly 1/2 lb pasta)

Amount Ingredient
¼ cup Peanut Butter, creamy style
1 fl oz Dry Sake
½ fl oz Honey
1-2 tsp,ea Tamari Soy Sauce & Thai Fish Sauce
1-2 tsp Dark Sesame Oil
1+ tsp Ginger-Garlic Paste
¼ tsp Salt
pinch Chinese Five Spice Powder
pinch Cayenne Pepper
dash Rice Vinegar

Whisk all ingredients together in a small bowl, then dilute to desired thickness with additional sake, and adjust seasoning to taste.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
ChowMein
Brewmeister
Posts: 1871
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:38 am
Location: Southern part of the Great White North

Re: RECIPES

Postby ChowMein » Thu Jan 14, 2016 5:35 am

Me mum cooked this many times for me and me litter mates .
It's chicken legs and/or thighs slowly cooked with spuds , or turnips/daikon , onions , ginger , a dash of soya , and oyster sauce ( amounts varied , dump the stuff in according to how you might like it ).
Toss it in a slow cooker .

This is a variation of her soya chicken as follows :

Place chicken in a pot , almost cover the bits with water , add soya to taste ( mum put in lots ) .
Bring to boil , reduce heat to very low and simmer .

Better yet , toss in a slowe cooker and add orange peels (dad keep dried ones in a jar , i am uncertain if they were mandarin or clementimes ?) , slivered ginger , garlic , and use oyster sauce / mushroom sauce and just a dash or three of the soya .

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Roving Punster » Thu Jan 14, 2016 11:11 pm

ChowMein wrote:Me mum cooked this many times for me and me litter mates .
It's chicken legs and/or thighs slowly cooked with spuds , or turnips/daikon , onions , ginger , a dash of soya , and oyster sauce ( amounts varied , dump the stuff in according to how you might like it ).
Toss it in a slow cooker .

This is a variation of her soya chicken as follows :

Place chicken in a pot , almost cover the bits with water , add soya to taste ( mum put in lots ) .
Bring to boil , reduce heat to very low and simmer .

Better yet , toss in a slowe cooker and add orange peels (dad keep dried ones in a jar , i am uncertain if they were mandarin or clementimes ?) , slivered ginger , garlic , and use oyster sauce / mushroom sauce and just a dash or three of the soya .


I make something very similar involving cubed rind-on slab bacon (pork belly) ... but the pork belly takes longer to get tender than chicken legs, so my usual modus operandi is to get the pork almost tender, then add the daikon in the last 40 mins, and the spuds in the last 20-30. The onions and ginger can be added early, medium or late, depending on how much (if any) textural presence you want from them. My pork belly version also uses a little star anise instead of oyster sauce, and i like to go light on soy sauce. I'll usually add a few dashes of mirin to complement the sweetness of the pork.

There are numerous other variations you can do. I've done versions of this with salmon frames (used to make the stock), and diced/scraped salmon flesh (added during the last 3 mins) ... just eliminate the oyster sauce and replace the soy with a few dashes of fish sauce and a little chicken glace to intensify and balance the flavor.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
ChowMein
Brewmeister
Posts: 1871
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:38 am
Location: Southern part of the Great White North

Re: RECIPES

Postby ChowMein » Sat Jan 16, 2016 9:23 am

Nice , tough to find fish sauce in my neighbourhood though , but i know of a new Asian supermarket that should have some .
I forgot what Papa used , authentic stuff though , would ye be so kind as to reccommend a brand ?

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Jan 16, 2016 1:59 pm

It's not so much as what brand to look for (because availability is sporadic, especially the further away you are from asian enclaves) as in knowing clues to avoid if choices allow you to do so. Fish sauce tends to darken/oxidize with time, so look for bottles have a lighter amber color rather than a dark cola color. Also, wherever possible, choose glass bottles over plastic, and smaller bottles over larger ones (less likely to get old before you finish them).

Personally, I like 3 crabs brand (pink label), but that's that's actually a middling brand. I use it because the market i get it from sells an ungodly amount of it, so it's usually the freshest of the brands available in my area. Tiparos (yellow label) is decent, if you can find it in glass. Squid (white and green label) is also good, if a tad salty. There are others, but the names escape me ATM.

One more tip regarding fish sauce ... it's great for adding a little umami and complexity to soups, stocks and sauces, but you MUST use it in moderation otherwise it can overpower things, and make everything taste like dried catfood tea. I usually only use a few dashs in dish serving 2-4 people. If you overdo it slightly, you have 2 choices ... add diced potatoes to absorb some of the salt/flavor, or add a little sweetness to soften the harsh edges.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
MourningStar
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 254
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:16 am

Re: RECIPES

Postby MourningStar » Sat Jan 23, 2016 7:17 am

Roving Punster wrote:One more tip regarding fish sauce ... it's great for adding a little umami and complexity to soups, stocks and sauces, but you MUST use it in moderation otherwise it can overpower things, and make everything taste like dried catfood tea. I usually only use a few dashs in dish serving 2-4 people. If you overdo it slightly, you have 2 choices ... add diced potatoes to absorb some of the salt/flavor, or add a little sweetness to soften the harsh edges.


This is the dang truth with most concentrated flavors like sesame oils and vanilla as well. Though I had an unfortunate incident the other day when I was adding "syrup" (plastic bottle sugar w/ dye) to my pancakes. WHO BUYS CINNAMON FLAVORED SYRUP!?! Apparently my mother did. We usually have only a single bottle. The regular kind. So I bit into my pancakes expecting the sweet sweet rush of corn syrup only to find a VERY odd flavor on my palate. Had to throw away a whole plate of hotcakes. :furious:
The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of men change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it. That which may be thought right and found convenient in one age, may be thought wrong and found inconvenient in another. In such cases, who is to decide, the living, or the dead? -Thomas Paine

User avatar
Nef Yoo BlackBeard
Sorcerer of Sauce
Posts: 3256
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:45 pm
Location: off me leesh
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Nef Yoo BlackBeard » Sat Jan 23, 2016 8:20 am

Shaem bowt da pangkakes .

Larrs Posst .
cabin boy fir hyer. jyint hat no hextra charj.

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Jan 23, 2016 7:54 pm

Nef Yoo BlackBeard wrote:Shaem bowt da pangkakes .

Larrs Posst .


This is a recipe thread, not the last post thread, my friend.

/me stars forelornly at 2 ft of blizzard driven snow just outside window.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
Nef Yoo BlackBeard
Sorcerer of Sauce
Posts: 3256
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:45 pm
Location: off me leesh
Contact:

Re: RECIPES

Postby Nef Yoo BlackBeard » Sun Jan 24, 2016 12:33 am

Yore band Uncca Woving Prankstar .....

4 not maeking a nuvver wressapee .
Fankye , ye welkum . :welcome:
cabin boy fir hyer. jyint hat no hextra charj.

User avatar
MourningStar
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 254
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:16 am

Re: RECIPES

Postby MourningStar » Sun Jan 24, 2016 2:39 am

Nef Yoo BlackBeard wrote:Yore band Uncca Woving Prankstar .....

4 not maeking a nuvver wressapee .
Fankye , ye welkum . :welcome:


Image

1 egg
6 cups water.
Salt to taste

Bring water to a simmer ( 160-180F ) DO NOT BOIL!
Gently place egg into water
let simmer for:
5 minutes for Soft
8-9 for Medium
12-15 for Hard

Do not cook longer than 15 minutes or the egg white/yellows will start to grey and taste like sulfur
Remove, Shock in an ice-bath. Peel gently and add salt to taste.
The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of men change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it. That which may be thought right and found convenient in one age, may be thought wrong and found inconvenient in another. In such cases, who is to decide, the living, or the dead? -Thomas Paine


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest