RECIPES

Foods to make in praise of our Blessed FSM, pasta based and otherwise.

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Ubi Dubium
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Re: RECIPES

Postby Ubi Dubium » Fri Jan 29, 2010 11:15 pm

PKMKII wrote:
Ubi Dubium wrote:In the States, pie typically is something fruit-filled and really bad for you, rather than a main dish.


What about beef or chicken pot pie? Or quiche?

Yes, that's why I said typically. I've certainly eaten more of the fruit-filled ones than the meat-filled ones. Not that I have either one available right now. :bummer:
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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:08 pm

Here's a fun, unusual take on BBQ spice rub and sauce: Caribbean style

It calls for Country-style ribs, but I used babybacks.

Rub:
2 TBSP fresh thyme
1 TBSP ground coriander
1 TBSP ground allspice
2 TSP salt
1/2 TSP freshly ground black pepper

use your preferred rib cooking method.

Sauce:
1 cup pineapple preserves
1/4 cup dark rum
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice

Heat all the ingredients in a sauce pan over medium heat until acceptably thickened.

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Re: RECIPES

Postby TwistedSister » Sun Aug 08, 2010 7:47 pm

I am looking for an authentic recipe for Swedish Meatballs. A recipe your Swedish Mom or GrandMom used to use, NOT something from a cookbook or the internet.
Years ago I worked with a Swedish woman who made THE BEST Swedish Meatballs, she never would give me the recipe though.
Any Swedes out there willing to share?????????

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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Sun Aug 08, 2010 10:14 pm

A really great Swedish meatball recipe passed down from a Swedish grandmother, probably isn't a recipe at all. More like "Here's the stuff that goes in, you know you've got the right amount of everything when it smells like how your grandmother's smelled."

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Re: RECIPES

Postby TwistedSister » Mon Aug 09, 2010 8:58 am

PKMKII wrote:A really great Swedish meatball recipe passed down from a Swedish grandmother, probably isn't a recipe at all. More like "Here's the stuff that goes in, you know you've got the right amount of everything when it smells like how your grandmother's smelled."

I can work with that.

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Re: RECIPES

Postby pnutcat » Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:41 pm

Satay noodlz

Get lotz ov pnutz an crunches dems up, an puts dems in a bole or sumfink

Ads sum sorts ov curi sors

Puts in lots ov pnut buta

Kil a chikin an sez "Oops, sori!" an chop bitz off an puts dems in az wel

Mek hot wiv cookage

Boyl noodlz an puts on plait wiv uvva stufs

Nom

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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:06 am

Do you want your Thanksgiving to be the best Thanksgiving Ever? Then you want Buffalo Fried Turkey.

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Re: RECIPES

Postby Arkaeon » Sat Feb 05, 2011 8:19 am

Regarding some earlier posts, about worcestershire sauce and especially SUGAR:

Throwing a little (not a lot!) of worcestershire sauce into meat salads (tuna, beef, pork, chicken, even egg salad) is really good. The trick is not to overdo it and give it time to soak in to the ingredients. Tuna takes only a little bit, chicken can handle a little more, and beef can take plenty. It is hit-and-miss on pork and lamb recipes, depending on the other spices, and I wouldn't use it with Salmon or a more delicate fish. You can also drizzle a little honey into many ground meat salads (especially poultry). Common commercially prepared steak sauces are basically worcestershire sauce, ketchup, sugar syrup, and a bit of soy sauce or anchovy paste.

Sugar (much of this also applies to honey):

I throw some sugar into most of my soups, sauces, gravies, and batters. It brings out the flavors of the vegetables and makes cream soups a little smoother and richer. I wouldn't do a marinara or spaghetti sauce without it. It's a real boon to anything spicy, and may replace some of the salt. You can sugar the water used to boil corn (awesome!) or other vegetables or pasta instead of / addition to the salt.

When I started doing chef duties for a local family restaurant, tricks like these led to record business levels. My cream of potato soup actually had to be served EVERY sunday or there would be terrible complaints. Some people came in every week specifically for that, and would nag the servers to try to get it served during breakfast. A little sugar in almost any casserole will make it mysteriously more flavorful, especially if there is any grain product involved (like pasta). Heat tends to sour carbohydrates and starches over time, so if you need to keep something hot to serve over a period of hours, as restaurants do, then a little sugar is magic at keeping the taste fresh. It also counteracts the tendency of dried herbs and spices to be more bitter or sour than their fresh counterparts, and compensates for cole slaw's natural fermentation souring process, even refrigerated (fresh cabbage naturally contains lager-type brewing yeasts that will ferment sugars even below 40°F / 5°C).

Sugar is absolutely magical with any recipe that uses dried garlic powder/granules. I used to roll some extra bread dough out nice and thin, sprinkle on garlic granules, dried basil flakes, and sugar; then roll it up, let it rise some, and bake it on a flat sheet pan; then cut it crosswise into spiral bread-biscuit sections. Huge hit.

In all of these examples, sugar is being used as a SPICE, not a bulk ingredient like in cookies. The dish does not have to become sweet, and in these applications you should not taste the sugar directly (unless you really want to), or you've made meat syrup. Sugar in small quantities acts like salt or MSG, sensitizing the taste buds and stimulating salivation, which makes everything taste richer and juicier. It makes gravies and sauces smoother in texture and more resistant to curdling or breaking. The owner of the restaurant I was helping was diabetic, and none of these dishes messed up his blood sugar levels. Most of the time, no one realized what I had done, thinking I was using some voodoo magic back there.

On the other hand, I make some (especially cajun) recipes that include rich stocks, cream sauces, hot peppers, garlic, or onions, where there may be much greater amounts of sugar (like 3/4 cup sugar/syrup to 6 chicken breasts, several jalepeno chilis, a couple onions, thickened by heavy cream and/or toasted cornmeal).

3/4 cup sugar and 1 cup water will make a nice cane syrup that you can add as a liquid ingredient with practically no dissolve time and no grainy texture. You can warm it a bit to get it to form the syrup quicker. Remember, if you add it to a recipe, that you are adding both sugar AND water.

For a deeper caramelizing flavor, you can heat sugar gently until it melts and browns for barbecue, stir-fry recipes, meat salads, drinks, coffee, and others. Darker caramels are more bitter and less sweet. There are a number of cautions on this, like don't pour liquids into melted/caramelizing sugar that is still hotter than boiling point of water, as you will get splattered with the kitchen equivalent of a napalm bomb explosion. Liquid sugar sticks to your skin and soaks in as it burns. Don't walk away from caramelizing sugar, as you will inevitably get distracted and end up with a heavy coating of nearly pure black carbon on your best saucepan forever. To store or dispense caramelized concentrate as a syrup, let it cool until it is definitely below boiling point of water, then add it to equal amount of hot water and stir it smooth, reheating some if needed.

Have fun, sweeties :)
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PKMKII
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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Tue Jan 24, 2012 10:20 pm

I put up a recipe for a Malted White Russian Pudding recipe up on instructables, with pictures and everything. Also, I'd be much obliged if you voted for it in their Coffee Challenge.
"How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and concluded, 'This is better than we thought! The Universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant. God must be even greater than we dreamed'? Instead they say, 'No, no, no! My god is a little god, and I want him to stay that way.'" - Carl Sagan

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Re: RECIPES

Postby bacon » Wed Jan 25, 2012 11:14 am

I was just looking for this thread.

I decided to enter a chili contest at the office. I have no idea what the prize for winning will be, but I do get a pretty cool apron for entering. I'll post a picture of it once I get it.

Does anyone have a secret tip for making chili? I'm going to be practicing in the kitchen for the next few weeks. The contest is on the 13th of February.
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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Wed Jan 25, 2012 12:42 pm

That depends, how hot do you want to make it?
"How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and concluded, 'This is better than we thought! The Universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant. God must be even greater than we dreamed'? Instead they say, 'No, no, no! My god is a little god, and I want him to stay that way.'" - Carl Sagan

"To doubt everything or to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the necessity of reflection." - Henri Poincaré

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Re: RECIPES

Postby bacon » Thu Jan 26, 2012 11:13 am

Well, I'm going to be using ye ole crock pot, that's for sure.

I want to make something with a zing to it, but that isn't overpoweringly hot.

I can't decide if I should go with ground meat or cubed meat - I know traditionally real chili is made with the cubes, but I'm trying to win a contest here and may go with the ground.

However, if I want to go with originality, I may decide to make it out of buffalo meat.
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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Thu Jan 26, 2012 7:02 pm

I like to use pickled mild green peppers at least. You can get cans of diced tomatoes with the peppers already in, or just buy a tin of them in the mexican food section. If you want things spicier, you can also throw in one adobo pepper (just make sure to take it out before serving). Hot sauces can work as well.

On meat thing: if your office is full of Texas ex-pats, they would see ground meat as blasphemy. If it's just Jerseyites, then they'd probably be confused by cubes.
"How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and concluded, 'This is better than we thought! The Universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant. God must be even greater than we dreamed'? Instead they say, 'No, no, no! My god is a little god, and I want him to stay that way.'" - Carl Sagan

"To doubt everything or to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the necessity of reflection." - Henri Poincaré

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Re: RECIPES

Postby Arkaeon » Thu Jan 26, 2012 8:38 pm

TwistedSister: (re: Swedish meatballs)
Like kimchee, chili, pecadillo, beef stew, and other cottage foods, the recipes for "traditional" swedish meatballs are incredibly varied. There is no single true version. I've had family recipes with or without tomato, potato, rice, gravy, bread crumbs, sugars, garlic; beef or beef/pork mixes, even with some chicken; some are simmered in a fry pan, some baked, sometimes cooked in their gravy, sometimes the gravy made separately and added afterwards or braised onto the finished meatballs. Honestly, a survey of internet recipes is as good a chance as any for you to find one you like. Since various ingredients made their way into Europe and USA at various times and were integrated with family traditions as they arrived, each cook makes their own signature recipe as they please, and 2 generations later it is a "tradition" even though many of these ingredients originate from far away and recent times.

-----

bacon: (re: chili)
As above, chili is an incredibly variable recipe. I would discourage using only the crock pot if you want to make something really distinctive that will stand out, though. The crock will tend to give you a mushy texture with ubiquitously indistinct flavor, and may come off with a generally "canned food" outcome.

The best chilis I've had involved starting by braising the meat (cubed!) with about 1/2 of the spices and the oil on high heat. This drives extra spice into the meat and tenderizes it, making for extra-zingy meat chunks. By searing the outside of the meat chunks on high heat, you help keep them from dissolving during the simmer stage at the end.
...then adding skillet-toasted cornmeal for thickener and adding/braising the vegetables that are intended to dissolve mostly into the stock, including most of the hotter fresh raw chili peppers (most or all of the onion, garlic, and chili peppers like pasilla, anaheim, jalepeno, bird, serrano, cayenne). You can add some worcestershire sauce or reduced red wine/juice at this point if you want some dark-roasty or fruity undertones. You have to stir/scrape vigorously at high heat to get this stage to work right without burning, until the vegetable juices stabilize the cornmeal. There will be a lot of spicy steam.
...if you are using dried/crumbled chilis or basil, they can go in now to soften a bit in the high heat. You can also add some beef stock base if you want to pump up the meat flavor.
...then adding whatever other raw vegetables (including perhaps some strip-cut onion) and the rest of the spices that are intended to remain as chunks and top-flavor in the final bowl, including the milder bell-, california-, and poblano-type peppers that should make up a large portion of the bulk, and adding some liquid beef stock (or water) for the chili's stock-making.
...then add softened beans and/or diced tomato if you are using them.
...then allowing the whole thing to simmer as low as possible, stirring occasionally, until tender with thick stock, but not mushy. Total cooking time with this method is probably around 2 hours if you're organized about it.
NOTES:
-Toasted cornmeal is an effective thickener when it has time to work, and darker toasting will give a richer coffee-like affect with a slight bitter that sets off the spicy, sweet whole. (You can even throw in a little instant coffee to get some mysterious dark flavor undertones, or brew some coffee grounds in a saucepan with your water/stock and strain it off before adding the stock to the chili.)
-Dry beans that are softened at home will give better texture than canned beans, if you choose to use them at all, but it isn't such a big deal that it's always worth the extra time.
-Whether or not to use tomato is one of those arguments that chili fanatics will never agree upon, so pick your own ground on that one. I am against using much tomato, personally, but that's just my taste. Fresh, thick-diced tomato without seeds is infinitely favorable to canned in any case. Canned tomato is abomination.
-For dried/ground spices, I like stuff like chipotle and ancho powders, paprika for richness, granulated garlic and onion as boosters, basil, coriander, some black pepper -- even a little touch of cinnamon and/or turmeric if I want to get exotic. I add a little sugar and/or honey to most stews like this to bring out the flavors and smooth the texture.
-A variety of bell pepper colors add to both the appearance and flavor of your chili. If you go cheap and just use green bell peppers, you can get a sour overtone. Adding a mix of red, yellow, and orange bells really help.
-Once it has simmered to basic tenderness, the chili should not be brought to boil again, just reheated enough to make a semi-steamy bowl-full. If you boil it again you will get mushiness and more sour flavors as sugars break down.
-A really good chili should have some chew left to it that isn't just meat gristle. No one needs slimy-goo bell peppers.
-Shredded cheese and sour cream at the table can add tasty richness and help cut some of the burn of a really spicy chili.

I know this isn't an exact recipe (I pretty much cook by "throw" at this point), but I hope that helps you in some way :)
In case you didn't realize it, I DO have a sense of humor. How about you?
"I will not fear. Fear is the mind-killer... I will face my fear. I will let it pass over and through me, and when it has gone, only I will remain." --The Bene Gesserit
"Time is a spiral. Space is a curve. I know you get dizzy, but try not to lose your nerve." -- Neil Peart
"I'm not in the ship. I am the ship." -- River Tam
"The truth is simple. It's the lies that get complicated." -- me
"No matter where you go, there you are." --Buckaroo Banzai

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PKMKII
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Re: RECIPES

Postby PKMKII » Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:37 am

Arkaeon wrote:Fresh, thick-diced tomato without seeds is infinitely favorable to canned in any case. Canned tomato is abomination.


Okay, this is true if you're getting local, farm fresh tomatoes when they're in season. However, most tomatoes in the grocery store (ESPECIALLY this time of year) are hothouse monstrosities that are picked when they're unripe and then artificially ripened with ethylene, have horribly thick skin, and tasteless, pale flesh. They're bred for transit and shelf life, not flavor. Whereas the canned tomatoes, because they're not getting shipped, can be made with better tomatoes.
"How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and concluded, 'This is better than we thought! The Universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant. God must be even greater than we dreamed'? Instead they say, 'No, no, no! My god is a little god, and I want him to stay that way.'" - Carl Sagan

"To doubt everything or to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the necessity of reflection." - Henri Poincaré


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