Favorite Foods

Foods to make in praise of our Blessed FSM, pasta based and otherwise.

Moderator: All Things Mods

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Nov 28, 2015 5:49 am

ET, the Extra Terrestrial wrote:(Cored hot peppers? Really??)

This is perhaps TMI, but although I havent had an acute incident yet (thank his noodly goodness), diverticulitis runs in my family, so I generally try to soften my temptations of fate by grinding my whole seed spices, and removing small seeds during prep wherever it's convenient to do so. I'll have to be more meticulous about it if/when I ever get an attack, but so far I've been fortunate.

Bottom line ... it's a preventative measure, not to reduce heat (I'm actually a hot pepper aficianado).
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
Nef Yoo BlackBeard
Tagliatelle Trainee Monk
Posts: 4078
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:45 pm
Location: off me leesh
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Nef Yoo BlackBeard » Sat Nov 28, 2015 6:38 am

i lykes foowd ,

my favritt iss peetser wiff pepparowni .
cabin boy fir hyer. jyint hat no hextra charj.

User avatar
ET, the Extra Terrestrial
Privvy Counselor
Posts: 6843
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:01 am
Location: In the woods, watching

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby ET, the Extra Terrestrial » Sat Nov 28, 2015 3:08 pm

Roving Punster wrote:
ET, the Extra Terrestrial wrote:(Cored hot peppers? Really??)

This is perhaps TMI, but although I havent had an acute incident yet (thank his noodly goodness), diverticulitis runs in my family, so I generally try to soften my temptations of fate by grinding my whole seed spices, and removing small seeds during prep wherever it's convenient to do so. I'll have to be more meticulous about it if/when I ever get an attack, but so far I've been fortunate.

Bottom line ... it's a preventative measure, not to reduce heat (I'm actually a hot pepper aficianado).

I accept your medical deferment. Complications from diverticulitis took a friend of mine several years ago, wouldn't want that to happen to you (or anyone else, for that matter). Make sure to have your regularly scheduled colonoscopies as recommended by your physician. Yes, that's me.

This year's pepper crop included jalapenos, serranos, cayennes, and yatsafusas. I'm drying batches of them separated by species, so I'll have (including the habaneros from last year) five different batches of flakes to torture myself and my friends with. Crushing the dried peppers is an amazing experience. No matter how much protection I wear, I sneeze for hours afterwards. Might have to break out the diving helmet one of these days.
"Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens."
("Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain.")
-- Friedrich Schiller (1759–1805)
Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
-- Philip K Dick

What happens when all the renewable energy runs out?
-- Victoria Ayling

English isn't much of a language for swearing. When I studied Ancient Greek I was delighted to discover a single word - Rhaphanidosthai - which translates roughly as "Be thou thrust up the fundament with a radish for adultery."

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Nov 28, 2015 3:50 pm

ET, the Extra Terrestrial wrote:This year's pepper crop included jalapenos, serranos, cayennes, and yatsafusas. I'm drying batches of them separated by species, so I'll have (including the habaneros from last year) five different batches of flakes to torture myself and my friends with. Crushing the dried peppers is an amazing experience. No matter how much protection I wear, I sneeze for hours afterwards. Might have to break out the diving helmet one of these days.


Never heard of or tried yatsafusas ... I'll have to look those up after posting this.

I thought jalapenos were too fleshy to dry effectively, which is why they're usually smoked in addition to drying (e.g., chipotles). if you're not smoking or pickling them I assume that mean you're slicing them to make them easier to dry ? Assuming so, are you doing greens or reds, and are you grinding them afterwards ? I've seen powdered chipotle, but never powdered jalapeno.

As for serranos, I've always found them somewhat redundant in flavor with jalapeno, but that's just me ... a little skinnier, and sorta pinky shaped, and moderate heat, but otherwise the same flavor as jalapeno.

As for myself, what I use depends on what I'm cooking. For northern indian curries I mostly use nice freshly dried cayennes that still have some fruitiness to them (I grind my own cayenne in small batches, for best flavor). For southern indian I'll use green thai birdeye or jalapeno if green chilies are called for (heat for the former, pepper flavor & texture for the latter) and dried cayenne or arbol if a more neutral heat is required. I mostly use my jalapenos for eggs, guacamole, corn salad, grilling (poppers !), and some stirfries. I only use habernero or bonnets for things like jerk chicken.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Roving Punster » Sat Nov 28, 2015 4:13 pm

Ok, I looked, and the yatsafusas look a lot like arbols, in terms of shape, color and heat. What's the flavor like ?

BTW, tip for onlookers regarding cayenne pepper ... if you're a true chili aficianado with a senstive palate, there's an easy upgrade you can try over commercial cayenne powder. Even though the heat is very shelf stable and will last for a long time, the fruity notes present in freshly dried whole cayennes are the result of volatile oils that are perishable, and fade in a few short months if left whole, and a few short weeks (at most) once ground ... which is why preground supermarket cayenne pepper is always plenty hot, but very one dimensional in flavor, because the fruity complexity has faded. If (like me) you really enjoy those subtle fruity nuances, the best way to buy cayenne is in whole unground form, in 4-8 oz bags, from an indo-pack or hispanic market that had a good turnover. The peppers should be bright red, not dark, and still have a little give (not brittle), and the bag should have a fruity red pepper aroma when squeezed gently. When you get them home, set aside a small portion in an airtight jar (enough to last you several weeks), and vaccumpack the rest in an airtight cryovac bag, which will keep them reasonably fresh for a year or more. Open and reseal the bag only to refill your daily use jar. To make ground cayenne, scatter a large palmful of the dried peppers into a 10" non-stick pan, and let it sit over lowest heat for 10 mins (or better still in an oven set on lowest heat) until they become aromatic, but not quite starting to darken ... then let cool completely until brittle. There's a tradeoff in using heat to dry them, because although it drives of the moisture to make them grindable, it also drives off some of the volatile oils you're trying to protect, so even better than pan/oven toasting is a countertop dehydrator ... if you can afford one. Anyway, for a powder that's redder and more fruity, discard seeds prior to grinding, but if maximum heat and a little bitterness is to your liking, leave the seeds in and grind them whole. Only grind enough to last a month, as the flavors tend to fade quickly.

Ok, that's my good deed for the day.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
ET, the Extra Terrestrial
Privvy Counselor
Posts: 6843
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:01 am
Location: In the woods, watching

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby ET, the Extra Terrestrial » Sat Nov 28, 2015 11:31 pm

The flavor of the yatsas is very similar to a Thai pepper. I'm not very good at subtle differences, so I'm probably overstating the similarity to some degree. I'm basically in it for the heat, with flavor differences being secondary - except that I absolutely LOVE the taste of fresh jalapenos. I actually do notice a moderately significant difference between jalapenos and serranos, though it's not so much a difference in flavor as it is in the intensity of the flavor. For me, jalapenos have a much more pronounced flavor, much stronger.

My drying method is much like my approach to most challenges - I use the Neanderthal philosophy. I have a loop of string hanging above the woodstove that is our heat source, and fifty or so peppers at a time are tied to it by their stems. They dry in a few days or weeks depending on how hot we are running the stove, and I remove them, bust off the stems, and pulverize them in a jar with a more-or-less ineffective cover to try to keep the dust down. Ideally I would have a mill for each variety, but things are usually somewhat less than ideal in my life. I just had some of the dried jalapenos on my spaghetti tonight, and they seem to have retained both heat and flavor pretty well. The flakes are fairly large, so I'm probably going to have to figure out a better way to pulverize them at some point.
"Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens."
("Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain.")
-- Friedrich Schiller (1759–1805)
Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
-- Philip K Dick

What happens when all the renewable energy runs out?
-- Victoria Ayling

English isn't much of a language for swearing. When I studied Ancient Greek I was delighted to discover a single word - Rhaphanidosthai - which translates roughly as "Be thou thrust up the fundament with a radish for adultery."

User avatar
MourningStar
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 254
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:16 am

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby MourningStar » Sun Nov 29, 2015 9:56 am

Roving Punster wrote:
BTW, tip for onlookers regarding cayenne pepper ...

Ok, that's my good deed for the day.



Great tip! Thanks! Look forward to trying it... and hopefully being able to NOT take a trip to the ER for severe mouth orgasms. :haha:
The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of men change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it. That which may be thought right and found convenient in one age, may be thought wrong and found inconvenient in another. In such cases, who is to decide, the living, or the dead? -Thomas Paine

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Roving Punster » Sun Nov 29, 2015 10:08 am

You're very welcome.

Air is definitely the enemy for dried chilies, and once you cryovac them properly, the shelf life of the volatile oils they contain improves dramatically, because there's no air left to oxidize and/or dissipate them, so they retain their fruitiness much better. For people without a vaccum sealer, their best bet is to buy peppers in the smallest quantity, and pack them tightly into small glass jars that are opened as infrequently as possible. Leaving the peppers whole (not broken or ground) for as long as possible helps too.
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")

User avatar
Roving Punster
Bucatini Buccanneer
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Long Island, NY (USA)
Contact:

Re: Favorite Foods

Postby Roving Punster » Sun Nov 29, 2015 10:16 am

Non-sequitur: Today's slightly disturbing food video is Daniel Boulud shoving a large bird loaf into Stephen Colbert's turkey.

And with that visual firmly in mind, Happy Holidays to all. :lol:
ΦΒΚ - Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης ("Love of learning is the guide of life")


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest